Meet Adele Archer

Adele!

Adele!

…and just when you thought the chin wagging stopped, I now present to you Adele Archer! Of course I met Adele on G+ because apparently that’s the only place I meet people as an adult. (Someone once commented on Twitter that trying to make friends as an adult is creepy as hell. I agree.) A random post shared by someone in my circle floated my way (Thanks Mir Fleur!). What first caught my eye was the picture accompanied by the post; it was a picture of a woman seated in front of a typewriter with her hand extended out to a lamp (or it might have been a candle). Her head was down as if she were exhausted or exasperated (same difference right?). Crumbled pieces of paper littered the desk. Hmm, what’s this all about? So, because pictures work to attract clicks, I clicked on the link. I’m glad I did. Her post was a riot! She spoke about the difficulties of blogging and her thoughts on why even bother? Now, as a writer, of course I connected with that picture and the content. What writer hasn’t felt like “what’s the point of blogging?” I know I’ve been there a few times. Ok, maybe a few times more than I really care to admit.

Any who, I love Adele’s humor! Every blog post, or even comment that I’ve read of hers has produced either a smile, a chuckle, or flat out laughter. Without further ado, get comfortable (with your cuppa) and get to know a little more about Adele below. Hopefully you’ll get a good chuckle in too:

Question 1. Name one surprising thing about yourself.

Answer 1. As a kid, I used to kick and scream on the floor, and cry myself to sleep about not being born a boy. Being born in the 70s, I had it in my head that life for a girl was substandard to the life and opportunities one was presented with as a boy (and I was kind of right at the time). But don’t worry, I’m delighted to be a girl now!

Q2. What’s your favorite food?

A2. That is such a tough question (being that I can put away food faster than anyone I know – so fast, I barely taste it), but I’m going to plump for Thai. I like the little taste explosion you get in your mouth with every bite – savoury, sweet, sour. Mmmm….food. I wish you hadn’t brought it up…

Q3. What’s your favorite movie and why?

A3. I love all Alfred Hitchcock movies but it would have to be The Rope. I love the way the entire movie is filmed in one shot (they just pan in and out of people’s backs or furniture as a change of scene – but there never really is a change of scene). And I love that the film is just like a stage play, all set in one room. I’ve got a thing about films etc being set all in one place (there was an episode of Seinfeld where they spent the entire show wandering around a multi-story carpark whilst looking for their car which I loved. You really have to be a clever writer to make that work – a piece set only in one area. I digress…). Plus I love Jimmy Stewart. Also, I love the subject matter of The Rope; is one person really more expendable than another?

Q4. Who is your favorite author and what is it about his or her work that resonates with you?

A4. That’s a difficult question too because my favourite genre would probably be fantasy series…ies…ies (like The Farseer Trilogy, Game of Thrones etc), but it’s actually going to have to be Bill Bryson. Because I always thought of him as a travel writer (which of course was quite wrong of me), I didn’t think he’d be my cup of tea. But I love everything he has ever written, and I love how his gentle humour flows through every paragraph – no matter what the subject. And it wasn’t until I started reading Bill Bryson that I realised I had to write with my own voice – I really credit Bill with that. It was futile to write like other people; using flowery, verbose language that wasn’t natural to me. I’m a cockney girl from the East End of London. So his writings taught me to play to my strengths, because it was okay to be myself. In fact it was essential.

Q5. What do you think makes a story good?

A5. If you ask me (which you just did), I’d say a good story needs to get going pretty damned quickly. I have the attention-span of a goldfish so as a reader and a writer, I like a story to grab your attention as soon as humanly possible. But perhaps more importantly, the character-development needs to be plausible. People are deep and complex in reality, so rounded, fully-functioning fictional characters need to mirror this. Oh, and I personally need to like at least one character in a book; we all need somebody to root for (but don’t do that if you’re reading Game of Thrones; everybody you care about dies. Spoiler alert.)

Q6. What’s your writing style (outline vs. free flow)?

A6. I always write with a more-or-less fully formed story framework in mind. I don’t think I could function if I didn’t know where the narrative was heading. Sometimes things will change in the process of writing but on the whole, I stick to the plan and get in done; like the pouring-forth of a big ‘splat’ of ideas on a page. Like vomit (but good vomit, mind). If I didn’t do that, I’d never finish anything. Then I go back and make serious alterations as necessary. And they’re always necessary, SERIOUS ones…

Adele's book

Adele’s book

Q7. Are you currently working on any writing projects?

A7. Always. I’m in the process of editing book two and three of ‘International Relations’ simultaneously. They’re both finished and the story is just about the way I want it, but there’s a fair bit of housekeeping to do! Once this trilogy is done and dusted (hopefully before the year is out), I’d like to write something completely different – like a fantasy book as that’s what I like to read. But I’m not 100% sure I have it in me. Of course, I’m blogging weekly too – which is a never-ending project in itself. So it’s safe to say I keep busy.

Q8. What is your most interesting writing quirk, if any?

A8. At the risk of sounding self-absorbed, I’d say my most interesting quirk is my quirkiness. I had to sit down one day and assess what would make me comfortable in actually putting my books out there for people to read rather than keeping them as a secret hobby on my laptop. And I figured that although I’ve always been adept at telling a good yarn, there was something missing from my work. And that thing was ‘me’. So I went back in and put myself in the books; i.e. my patter-of-speech, my idiosyncrasies, my neuroticisms and mostly, my stupidly childish sense of humour. [S.M. side note: which I love! Don’t lose that sense of humor! I’ve chuckled a few times so far.]

Q9. Where do your ideas come from?

A9. I used to play a lot of very elaborate games as a kid; being one of six, I went to great lengths to go off and be alone. All kids play but I’m fairly sure my games were a bit odd. I had an old biscuit-tin of soldiers and I invented an entire intricate story (with backstories and subplots) about how these soldiers were imprisoned in this tin (jail) and their various thwarted attempts to break free. I’d sit there murmuring to myself doing their dialogue. And this quickly transpired into me writing these and other narratives down. So a lot of my ideas were formed in childhood. I’ve been writing stories in my spare time since I was a girl and those ideas (I still maintain) were very good ones. I just needed to be a grown-up to give them validity and life.

Q10. What’s the hardest thing about writing to you?

A10. Time. Boring but true. I don’t get writer’s-block, thankfully. I pretty much always know what to write about, but it’s just finding the time to do it. Fitting in a part-time writing career around work and family isn’t easy but it’s the only creative outlet I have so I always find a way.

Q11. What was the inspiration behind your novel, International Relations?

A11. ‘International Relations’ came about as a spin-off from something I used to write about in my early teens. I used to love all the American 80s soap operas – Dallas, Dynasty, The Colby’s – I liked stories that didn’t have to come to a conclusion. So I wrote a soap-opera of my own (God, I was a bit of a weird kid, wasn’t I?) and ‘International Relations’ was just a follow-on story from some of the characters in that.

Q12. Where can readers find out more about you and your work (e.g. blog, Goodreads, Amazon, Twitter, etc.)?

A12. Well obviously I’m all over FaceBook, Twitter and Google Plus – but I’m always more than happy to provide a handy link! I’m very thoughtful like that!! [S.M.: LOL]

 

Global Amazon Book Link:  InternationalRelations

 

Adele Archer Writes Blog:  adelearcherwrites

 

My AboutMe Page (all my social media links):   about.me/adelearcherwrites

 

Goodreads:  goodreads.com-international-relations

 

Thanks for participating Adele! It was nice getting to know a little more about you. 🙂

Whelp, we’ve come to the conclusion of our mini British explosion… just in the knick of time. I think talking to Brits as inspired the weather to act up. It’s been raining nonstop for the past two days. Coincidence? Eh, perhaps, but we’ll see if this rain lets up later today or tomorrow.

It has seriously looked like this for the past two days

It has seriously looked like this for the past two days

British Invasion!

The Union Jack: Image courtesy of Wikipedia

The British are coming… To this blog over the next couple of days! Two lovely people from the UK are dropping by and chatting for a bit. First up, we have Kieron, who I met on (drumroll)… G+! If you’ve been keeping up with previous posts, then that should be no surprise. I meet just about everyone on G+.

Kieron is a bloke from England that runs a blog discussing all things movies and television (surprisingly, he watches a ton of American stuff). He kindly stopped by to talk shop. Today, we’re comparing British vs. American slang.

So, sit back, get comfortable, and grab a cuppa. It’s time to do a little chin wagging with Kieron:

General Expressions:

Wind me up = annoy me -> I think this would be the equivalent to someone here saying “are you kidding me”, or “are you trying to piss me off?”

Grab a cuppa = to get a cup of tea -> I don’t think we have anything directly comparable to this aside from “get something to drink.”

Cheers = goodbye or thanks -> We just say thanks or in some instances, “appreciate it” or “appreciate you.” Now we have many ways to say goodbye: deuces, peace, I’m out, see ya, I’m about to bounce, I’m leaving, etc. It’s endless!

Cock up = a mistake -> We’d say “I, or, so and so fucked up or messed up.” Sometimes we’ll say something is “jacked up” although I haven’t heard someone say that in a while.

Chuffed = pleased about something -> The closest word I could think of that’s similar is “stoked” or “excited.”

Ace = something that is good or awesome -> We’ll say that’s “dope” or “cool.”

All right? = Hello, how are you? -> Ok, what?! That must definitely be determined by voice inflection! We’ll say: “What’s up”, “[are] you good” or, what’s happening?”

Bladdered/Pissed = intoxicated from alcohol -> We say: “I’m drunk”, “I’m fucked up”, or “I’m pretty lit, tanked up, smashed,” etc.

Me and Kieron

Me and Kieron putting our heads together to come up with some slang comparisons.

Let’s get pissed = Let’s get drunk (together) -> “Let’s get tore up, tanked, smashed, trashed,” etc. I think we even say the vague “let’s go out” that implies drinks will be involved and subsequently, drunkenness.

Buggar = another word for bloody as in “bloody hell.” -> Maybe how we say “damn” out of exasperation or anger? I can’t think of anything that’s similar.

Cheesed off = Pissed off/angry -> We just say “pissed off” or “ticked off”.

Twat = a swear word -> We have a bunch of those. Take your pick! Lol!

Chin wag = chatting -> I don’t think we have anything cutesy for chatting except maybe “let’s chop it up,” or “let’s talk shop.”

Gaff = a small place to hang out ->  I wasn’t sure what to make of this one because Kieron insisted that it’s a small hang out spot. I asked if he meant like an apartment (or a flat as all my British peeps call it). He said it’s smaller than a house, but not necessarily an apartment. The first thing to pop into my mind was a treehouse, but I don’t think that’s what he meant. So, I think we know this as the vague “chill spot”, which can be anything from a house to an apartment, or even a public space such as a bar or park.

Bunking off = to deliberately miss school -> We say skipping school.

Mate = friend -> Buddy, homeboy/girl, or homie

Girls vs. Boys:

Bloke = a guy -> We say dude

Bird = a girl -> We say chick

Slag = a promiscuous girl -> We say slut, whore, hoe, skank, hoebag, etc.

Bollocks = testicles -> We’ll say balls

Well that’s all that we could come up with. Of course slang differs by regions, cultures, and other factors. Therefore, I’m sure I’m forgetting something from the American perspective. Anyway, thanks for dropping by Kieron! You can follow him on Twitter and G+. If you’re looking for a breakdown of scenes within TV and movies, then I’d suggest you head over to his site.

The British invasion isn’t over! Fellow indie author Adele Archer (also from England) is stopping by the blog tomorrow. Hopefully she’ll read this and add some more words Kieron and I didn’t think of!

If you know any more slang, either British or American, leave it in the comments below!

Meet Michael Stephenson

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I met Michael, once again, on Google+. Actually, I think we met from the same “venting post” from which I met K.G., but I’m not entirely sure. I just know that Michael has detailed and insightful information on anything I pick his brain about (you’ll soon see). He’s even left some thoughtful comments on some of my prior posts (which I greatly appreciate). Another thing that’s cool about Michael is that he’s funny. Anyone who knows me knows that I’m super, super silly and that I LOVE a good laugh/joke. I’ve gotten a hearty chuckle from his Twitter comments (when he hasn’t disappeared, hibernating with his multiple projects). Get to know more about him below:

Question 1. Name one surprising thing about you.

Answer 1. I had a constant and persistent headache that didn’t go away for years only increasing and decreasing in pain. As a by-product, it’s made me a little crazy and I think I’m psychic. Seriously.

Q2. What is your favorite movie and why? 

A2. The favorite movie thing is like asking what’s my favorite dessert or food. It depends highly on my mood. Forrest Gump is up there because it tells the story of America and its people and how badly we all want love in this world. Shawshank Redemption is also high because of the brotherhood, and how even in tragedy good things can come. There are some others I enjoy like Curious Case of Benjamin Button and The Dark Knight, and The Sound of Music and It’s A Wonderful Life but again, it is highly concentrated on my mood.

Q3. Who is your favorite author and what is it about his or her work that resonates with you? 

A3. “Art is the righting of something, the ability to tell its truth.” A teacher once said that to me—she may have been paraphrasing someone else at the time, but didn’t say who. With that said, Stephen King is one of my favorites. I enjoy his writing because even though much of it is horror with outlandish plots, it rings true. The characters, the settings, how they interact, even their foibles all feel real. I think, unlike other authors, he allows his characters to be more human and make mistakes and do illogical things. There’s not always someone doing the expected thing in his stories, which is refreshing.

Q4. What do you think makes a story good?

A4. Hell, if I knew that, I’d be a millionaire. What makes a story good is up in the air. I’m not often too sure what I think makes a story good. I find not only myself but others seeing or reading something and connecting with it but not knowing why. Most people, most authors especially, would jump to “it’s the characters, the characters!” which is a nice sentiment, however, that doesn’t really explain the allure of things like fairy tales and old time stories so ancient they seem not to have any identifiable characters. Think about the story of Cinderella. Before Disney came in, she didn’t have much character to her at all. Sure, she had circumstances that affected her, but the core story could be changed and manipulated to have her be a thousand different things and a thousand different ways.

Then, there’s the actual story. I consider myself more a storyteller than a character analyst (not to say that the characters are thin). The story has to draw in the reader in my opinion because the characters might not be likable or alive for a long time or even be identifiable to the reader (ex. Song of Ice and Fire: Game of Thrones series). But if the story draws them in, they can withstand an evil character with no redeeming qualities or someone they can’t relate to so long as they are engrossed in wondering what happens next.

Good story is determined highly by the current prejudices of the reader. My prejudices can vary wildly from month to month.

Q5. When and why did you begin writing?

A5. It happened when I was eleven. I always had a great imagination and saw myself in the film and entertainment industry. I wanted to act. And then I learned that if I wanted story input, I had to be the storyteller, so I wanted to direct and produce but even that wasn’t enough. Getting the worlds that existed in my head onto paper was naturally the last step. Eventually, I will achieve all of these things… I’m psychic, remember.

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Q6. What writing projects are you working on at the moment?

A6. Warning! System overload. Asking me that question is like asking the Pope how Catholic he is. Very! He’s very Catholic. Uh… hmm! That actually wasn’t as great of an analogy as I thought it’d be. Put it this way, I’m working on a lot of stuff.

First, I have the comedy “Yep, I’m Totally Stalking My Ex-Boyfriend” which is about a 30-something woman who is, well, you know. She’s stalking her ex-boyfriend. Come on people, keep up! That’s in editing and will be out in early October.

Next, I have an as yet untitled YA project, tentatively titled “Ghosting”—though that’s probably not going to be the title… but it could be the title. That won’t be out until next year. That is in the late stages of development (two weeks from primary typing).

There’s “The Man On The Roof,” a mystery that will totally be a bestseller (again, psychic!) which I will be trying first to take the traditional publishing route. That is currently in typing and will continue throughout the rest of the month.

There are all my other late editing projects: “The Maiden’s Cocoon” (drama/mystery), “The Knowledge of Fear” (mystery), “Cavity” (horror/humor), “A New Low” (the long-delayed sequel to A Dangerous Low), “A Negotiation of Sorrows” (long-delayed sequel to the Erotica/Legal drama A Negotiation of Wounds), and “The Writer.” The Writer’s first season is completed and currently has 12 of its 15 episodes out and online at Amazon (check the link below or search The Writer Michael Stephenson). Naturally, I think all writers and readers should read it especially since it has kicked into overdrive. It is a character-study of sorts. I’m not going to bore you with the details here, as I could talk about it all day. And finally, I am working on my most painfully personal work, Unrequited. It starts with the story of a girl I once fell in love with. That will be an actual serial novel (as opposed to an episodic novella series like The Writer) sometime next year.

Let me expand on this answer because I know people are freaking out and rolling their eyes, saying, “that’s too many projects. He can’t be working on all of them right now.” Actually, I am working on all of them concurrently. At any one given time when I am not on vacation I have at least 5-8 projects on which I am actively writing. “Well, you’re not gonna get all of them done.” Yes, I will and most of them by the end of the year (and that’s not even including the scene book for season two of The Writer coming Summer 2016 nor the scene book for another episodic novella series entitled Extraordinary coming sometime next year). Plotting and things of that nature I do in my down time after finishing primary writing. This is a way for me to never have writer’s block, keep mentally sharp, and change my mindset enough to figure out if a scene works or doesn’t and what I want it to accomplish. And no, I don’t have ADD. God, I hope that didn’t sound like bragging.

Q7. Where do your ideas come from?

A7. Just from my imagination and dreams. Very rarely will I pull from something else. Exceptions are: Unrequited is reality/fantasy, The Provocateur was assigned to me to write, and Darker, while essentially a highly influenced Stephen King work, did not originally start that way. Now, it stands as an updated version of Carrie dealing with current racial tensions. Outside of that, everything else is imagination, and only becomes “inspired by” or “based on” during the marketing phase.

Q8. What is the hardest thing about writing for you?

A8. Grammer. Its got two be that and sumtimes mispelling words. On some occasions, I have been too fixated on the proper English words and phrases and their construction that I rip the voice out of a character. Oddly, many editors I’ve had have done this as well.

Q9. What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk, if any?

A9. I don’t believe I have any writing quirks. A quirk to me is something that is odd, like people who can’t start a novel without a glass of Merlot or people who put that big glob of sunscreen on the tip of their nose. You can’t rub that into your nose? Seriously? Or is that just the only place you put it. Like, your nose is gonna be the very first thing that gets sun burnt or that skin cancer will only attack the nose. And while we’re on the subject, what in the world is up with these sunburn tattoo designs? Who the hell said that was a good idea? You know what, I’ve gone off on a tangent. What was the question?

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Q10. What has been one of the biggest lessons you’ve learned from your experiences as a writer?

A10. There are many, but I’d actually list three:

  • Take writing seriously.
  • Be open to new writing experiences (whether it be in genre or with partners, etc.)
  • For self-pub writers have a clear goal of where you want to take it.

The first is clear, just take your writing seriously. This is a business. As much as you may be in it for yourself, your main job still is to entertain the audience that will buy your stuff.

The second is to be open to new experiences. Because of my desire to write for film, I had to learn a few lessons early. One of the biggest: partnership. I would actually recommend writing with a partner for every self-pub author at some point. Why? For one, I sincerely think this will be the trend for the independent market in the near future. Think about it, you do a few of your own independent works, then come together with another writer who has done the same. Each of you get to expose your writing to a wider audience. You partially ride the success of another. That’s why I say for writers I know to be ready next year when I write my bestseller ;).

Also, writing with someone else challenges you out of your comfort zone. You get to see how someone else works, how they process information, etc. It can force you to grow as an author. I always try to stay open to writing with others, though it is exceptionally difficult. But, again, seeing how someone else works can really ignite your own fire to tackle your writing as a business. It can also spur you to figure out if this is something you really want to devote your free time to.

For all authors, but self-pubs especially know what you want. I find many self-pub authors don’t have a plan after publishing their first, or second or even third book. What’s your end goal? Just a few years ago many self-pub and vanity authors wanted to sell enough to take the figures to a real publisher and maybe get a deal (a la John Locke). Now, that sentiment has partially faded and there is no real plan. What if nobody wants your self-pub books, what then? Do you want to be read or just published?

I always take the 50/50 rule. The rule goes: as a writer, you should aim to write between 3 and 5 books a year and self-pub two. The other books should be the ones you submit to publishers as your best work. Tons of writers will take that suggestion badly and think that I’m only publishing my inferior stories. No. You should think that all of what you write is good enough to publish. If not, don’t publish it. But you must also be judicial enough in your writing to take a less emotional look at your stories and see which ones would be the absolute best. Those, you set aside for query. Also, forget the whole “self-pub will ruin your chances at traditionals” theory. If you actually have readers, reviewing it and wanting to read more already, publishers might frown upon your indie exploits, but in the end they still want to move books, and just like in film, a built in audience is a surefire way to get real sales.

Q11. What is your writing process like?

Q11. Chaotic but concise. I go through seasons of expectation. For instance, the summer is generally my generation season. I walk a lot to keep healthy and while on my walks, I will come up with the majority of my new ideas and plots. Full scenes pop into my head, and if I find them good, then I will go back and note them down on my running outlines and ideas’ page. When I start working on them is determined by how forceful the vision is. For instance, if only one scene comes to me, I’ll jot down a few generalities, then put it on the back burner. But if a number of scenes pop into my head, then I know it’s time to actually plot it out and write it sometime within the next year; in fact, that is almost exclusively how I write. I’m not the type of person that sits and plans out the details of the scenes (there are a few exceptions, ex. The Writer). They have to come naturally for me, or else I start questioning whether those are the scenes and aspects of the story that want to be told. I feel like at some point, the stories have to naturally come and develop. The story, in most cases, tells you what it wants to say and how to say it. There are really only two times one should have a problem in the process: when you’re one-third to half of the way through and you’ve exhausted all the scenes that come to you naturally, and during the editing process.

I write fast but that doesn’t mean I’m rushing or don’t give proper care to all stories. I have tons of first draft novels waiting to be edited because I want to give them the proper care they deserve. I also don’t stop and revise/edit during writing. I separate them for two reasons: one, when the ideas are flowing, I don’t like slowing down and two, I find that sometimes you can edit and revise out something that may have been brilliant (OK, just really good; humility and stuff). I never delete anything. Instead, I will move a passage down to the end of the document onto a scratchpad because it could come in handy later in the novel. My process is fast and hectic but very concentrated on precisely what my imagination tells me should happen next.

Q12. How can readers discover more about your works (e.g. Goodreads, Amazon, website, etc.)?

A12. So many ways: Amazon Goodreads Goodreads Groups Twitter

And finally I have my own blog, which focuses mostly on TV and books occasionally, with a few recipes and off-topic posts on whatever pops into my mind at the time. It is going back into effect next week to align with the new TV season and I will be unloading a few book reviews from my summer reading as well. Check that here: http://r-u-notentertained.blogspot.com/

So, in conclusion, two tidbits that stuck out to me were  that I should get more disciplined with my writing schedule (don’t think I can) and that I should seek out a writing partner. Hmm… Now the latter is something I’d be interested in doing.

Thanks for participating Michael! Make sure to check him to on social media and check out his stories.

10 Random (Yet Comical) Writer Memes

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You’ve heard the joke before. Writers are big time procrastinators. In fact, they procrastinate so badly that you wonder how they even get any writing accomplished. (On an anecdotal note, I tend to get my best writing done in spurts. For example, I won’t write anything for two or three days and then I’ll go on a random ten-hour bender.) I was ecstatic when I saw these recurring jokes online. After all, I thought that I was the only person who stared blankly at a screen for ten minutes or so before deciding to check Twitter or G+. However, this seems to be a common thread that I share with fellow writers. So, on a morning chocked full of procrastination, I decided to make another lighthearted post. Sit back and postpone your musings for a minute or so. Here are ten comical memes pertaining to writers:

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Hmm…

10. Accurate. Sometimes it seems like my characters are telling me the story and I’m just the scribe. Other times, I’m trying to dig deep into my creative reservoir to see what I can come up with. When the latter happens, it’s time to hop on Twitter or G+.

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Try insulting a writer at your own risk

9. Need I say more? Don’t mess with a writer and her keyboard (and sometimes pen and paper).

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Beware of plot holes and crazy story logic

8. Anyone who examines a plot and sees gaping holes (be it movies or novels) will tell you why the aforementioned meme is spot on. Or, if the story just doesn’t make any sense, this meme is also appropriate.

Writer's Meme 9

Procrastination at its finest.

7. Ha! Story of my life while in the middle of any writing project. I even remember going through these same categories while procrastinating for school work.Well, maybe not the comparison piece.

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Are you ready to go yet?

6. What can I say? I’m a little introverted. However, listening to others socialize can yield great ideas for future storylines or characters.

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Ha! Where’s my tribe?

5. Anybody who’s read this post will and this post understand why I selected this meme. The struggle is real!

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Well, is it?

4. Ha! More of an inside joke for myself. I wear my satin bonnet whenever I’m parked in the house for the day.

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Happens to me all the time.

3. I actually find these conversations beneficial. I really get to know my characters and it helps me keep them authentic throughout the course of the story. I particularly enjoy interviewing them. Or, I could just have multiple personalities. Am I crazy or nah?

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Another thing that happens to me more times than not

2. When I have those ideas on the tip of my brain right before I fall asleep, I jot down notes in my cell before tossing it on the nightstand and rolling over. Sometimes, I’ll even dream about those ideas. When I wake up, I’ll get the cell and jot down the details I remember.

1.  I love this meme, which is why it’s number 1! I think it’s an accurate description of different people’s perception of who writers are and what we do. What are your favorite memes? As always, leave a comment below or find me on social media! If you liked this post, please don’t be afraid to share the love! 🙂

Yep!

Yep!